Sumpter, Oregon, Pet Supplies, Books, & Gifts
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Gifts

As of 10 Sep 2012, Gifts includes: jewelry, books by Oregon authors, books on the outdoors (some by Oregon authors), PartyLite selections, and an ever-shifting inventory that we'll call miscellaneous. There are blurbs about several of the books by Oregon authors and pictures of a few Summer and Autumn PartyLite items.

Jewelry:
The current stock of hand-crafted necklaces and earrings was created by a local businesswoman's daughter. The earrings sell for $5/pair and necklaces for $5 each. Below are photos of most of the necklaces and a few of the earrings. There are also many winter-themed earrings.


  

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Books by Oregon authors:

Biographical & Autobiographical
Tweens
Hiking in Oregon
History &
Historical Fiction
Humor
Mysteries
Poetry
Romance
Westerns

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Books about the Outdoors:

Animal Tracks
Birds
Children, Tweens, Young Adults
Constellations
Cooking
First Aid
Gardening
Geology
Knots
Mushrooms
Survival

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Soda Mountain has some "vintage" PartyLite candle holders and candles. Holder displays change slightly with the seasons: Spring, Summer & Patriotic, Autumn & Halloween, Winter & Christmas. 

Summer & Patriotic examples
     
Summerfest watermelon, lemon, and orange tealight holders; Americana tealight lamp; and Island Oasis Auroraglow ball candle

Autumn & Halloween examples
       
Whispering Leaves; Abracadandle tealight holder; Abracadandle snuffer

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Miscellaneous items currently include science kits, frames, photos, postcards, stationery, music, umbrellas, snow gliders, baskets, pails, and balloons.

 


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History
                                
Modern Oregon’s population may live mostly west of the Cascades, but much of ancient Oregon’s geological activity lies east of them. In fact, the Blue and Klamath Mountains contain Oregon’s oldest rocks. Ellen Morris Bishop’s In Search of Ancient Oregon: A Geological and Natural History covers from the time four hundredmillion years ago when Oregon was seabed to current methods of detecting earthquakes.   ($29.95)
 
A Pictorial History of Gold Mining in the Blue Mountains of Eastern Oregon was put together by Howard Brooks, who worked as a geologist for 35 years for the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. Photos are drawn from a variety of archival and contemporary sources.The book is considered one of the classics of Oregon’s mining history.   ($20.00)
 
A retired and respected Baker HS English teacher, Eloise Dielman still teaches writing classes. She also edits, compiles, and writes for the Baker County Historical Society and Friends of the Library. Baker County—Links to the Past is just one of her many accomplishments. It is a compilation of articles and stories that shed light on life in Baker County.   ($10.00)
 
Dr. James R. Evans is practically a legend in the annals of Baker County’s educational history. His Gold Dust & Chalk Dust expands his importance as he tells of the history of all the school districts in Baker Co. The book includes lists of graduating classes from high schools from their foundings through 2006, including Sumpter High School’s classes of 1905-1918.   ($15.00)
 
Diane Goeres-Gardner is a fifth-generation Oregonian. Her book Murder, Morality, and Madness uncovers a past of abuse, neglect, and double standards for women criminals.   $16.95
 
The reason Isacc Hiatt’s book about Baker Co.—Thirty-one Years in Baker County: A History of the County from 1861 to 1893—is so short is because it was initially published in 1893. History doesn’t get much more up close and personal than that.   ($10.00)
 
The Oregon Desert, by E.R. Jackman and R.A. Long is a mix of anecdotes, history, natural history, and photographs of south eastern OR to 1964.   ($17.95)
 
Alfred Mullett and Leonard Merritt both live and work in the Portland area, but are also both members of Sumpter Valley Railroad Restoration, founded in Dec 1970. Sumpter Valley Railway is a pictorial story of that line, which ran from Baker City to Prairie City, about 80 miles, until track started being abandoned in 1933. Sumpter Valley Logging Railroads shows the people, mills, and logging practices of that bygone era.   ($21.99 ea)
 
In the 1850s, the Oregon Territory was carved into states, and the native peoples had little say in their own destinies.  Kurt R. Nelson’s Treaties and Treachery: The Northwest Indians’ Resistance to Conquest covers this chaotic period.   ($18.95)
 
Oregon’s Golden Years, by one-time Greenhorn mayor Miles F. Potter, is another standard of mining history in Oregon.   ($14.95)

Oregon author William L. Sullivan
is known for his dedication to researching both his hiking books and his fiction. In Oregon’s Greatest Natural Disasters, he tells the stories of past floods, fires, tsunamis, earthquakes, and eruptions. He also looks at the cycles behind natural disasters and speculates what could happen during the next “Big One.”   ($18.95)

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Historical Fiction
           
Marie Dorion was the only woman on 1811’s Wilson Price Hunt Expedition from Montreal to the Oregon Territory, refusing to leave her husband’s side when he was hired to help the expedition reach Fort Astoria. She took their two young sons along, had a third child near North Powder in Dec 1811, and moved to the Willamette Valley in 1814 after her husband’s murder in eastern Oregon. Jane Kirkpatrick tells Marie’s story in three volumes: A Name of Her Own, Every Fixed Star, and Hold Tight the Thread. Jane has also written a biography of time spent on a remote ranch in John Day River country, and an historical fiction, A Land of Sheltered Promise, that spans three time periods and three stories of the Big Muddy Ranch.   (first two titles $13.99 each; final two titles $14.99 each)

Bill Sullivan is an Oregonian who has trekked 1000s of miles in preparing his books about hiking. He also writes historical fiction. The Ship in the Hill alternates between Viking history and 1904 Norway, when the largest Viking ship burial yet discovered turned out to belong to a woman.   ($14.95)
                  
 
Whit Deschner lives in eastern Oregon part-time, and seems to be traveling the rest of the time. Travels with a Kayak features his “escapades of questionable facts and unleashed humor … as he paddles down some of the world’s most renowned and obscure rivers.”  ($19.95)
 
Reverend Dun Gordy was born in Georgia in 1938, but once he saw eastern Oregon, that became his heart’s home. In Confessions of a Poachin’ Parson, he writes of hunting camps on Pole Creek Ridge, the mishaps of not knowing how to unload a borrowed shotgun, and the homesickness that arose from being transferred in 1988 from Baker City to Florida.   ($10.00)
 
Terry Larkin’s father worked as a wrangler on the movie sets of “Paint Your Wagon” and “Rooster Cogburn and the Lady,” both filmed in and near Baker County. (That's the white stallion from "Paint Your Wagon" on the cover.) The stories his dad brought home inspired Terry to pay tribute to friends and family with a comic western. In Marshal Shawn Felton and the Wild Bunch, you never know who’s going to wander through.   ($5.00 due to historical inaccuracies and really bad editing)
 
Anyone who reads Baker County’s “The Record-Courier” is probably familiar with Debby Schoeningh’s hilarious take on ranching life. Tails From the Country Side is the first collection of her stories about being a city girl married to an eastern Oregon rancher. The second and third are The Horseless Rancher and Cattle Drive.   ($14.95 ea)
Oregon native Michael J. Barker filled Out of Oregon: Logging, Lies, and Poetry with humorous short stories and poems that pay tribute to the loggers of old as well as to Michael’s modern logging buddies. In addition to logging, there’s also fishing and hunting, of course.   ($10)
 
Gail Denham’s Dancin’ thru Puddles is a book of short poems, from whimsical to heart-breaking. Gail has also written fiction, essays, and news articles. Her photography has appeared in books, magazines, calendars, textbooks, newspapers, and more.   ($8)
 
Misha Nogha has written novels, poetry, and librettos. Magpies & Tigers is a collection of one prose piece and many poems, from one stanza to three pages long. Much of the writing reflects Misha’s mixed Native American/Norse heritage. When Magpies & Tigers was published, she and her composer husband owned a small horse ranch in eastern Oregon where they raised Norwegian Fjord horses.   ($10)
 
At the time of publication of Paper Bird, Pamela Steele—born in West Virginia—lived on the Umatilla Indian Reservation near Pendleton, Oregon, and was involved with northeastern Oregon’s writer’s conference, Fishtrap. Her poems are mostly made up of only a few stanzas and are often poignant.   ($12)

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Kerry A. Jones was raised on a northeastern Oregon cattle ranch. Her series “The Quinguard Immortals” (beginning with Cast in Stone and continuing in The Stone’s Release) is paranormal romance with a twist: the paranormal element involves a gargoyle. Loved Enough is a contemporary romance set in eastern Oregon. Kerry runs Baker City romance publishing house Black Lyon Publishing.   ("Cast in Stone" $15.95; "The Stone's Release" $13.95; "Loved Enough" $10.95)           
 
Judie Kleng was born and raised in the Pacific Northwest. She worked as a 911 dispatcher, retiring recently, and currently lives in LaGrande. Pirate Unmasked is her first novel. She also enjoys songwriting and performs in local area clubs.   ($15.95)
 
Romance author Mary Vine set her first two novels (Maya’s Gold and A Place to Land) in northeastern Oregon. She and her husband lived on the west side of the state for a while, but they’re back on the east side of the Cascades now. Her most recently released novel is Wanting Moore.  ("Maya's Gold" $15.95; "Place to Land" $12.95; "Wanting Moore" $9.95)

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